Divine Mercy Prayer Group

Jesus I trust in youThe Divine Mercy Prayer Group, is a group that is devoted to the Messages of Divine Mercy. 

The Divine Mercy Chaplet meets: 
Weekdays after the 8:30 a.m. Mass, and Saturdays after the 8:00 a.m. Mass.

What is Divine Mercy all about?

On the 22nd of February, 1931, Sister Maria Faustina Kowalska had a vision of Jesus while she was in Plock, Poland. Jesus appeared to her and said;

“Paint an image (seen here at left) according to the pattern you see with the signature: JESUS I TRUST IN YOU. I promise that the soul that will venerate this image will not perish. I also promise victory over (its) enemies already here on earth, especially at the hour of death. I Myself will defend it as My own glory” 

Jesus gave Sr. Faustina many messages and asked her to record these experiences, which she compiled in notebooks. These notebooks are known today as the Diary of Saint Maria Faustina Kowalska and the words contained within are God’s loving message of Divine Mercy. These requests of the Lord given to Sr. Faustina between 1931 and 1938 can be considered the beginning of the Divine Mercy Message and Devotion in the new forms.

Pope John Paul II canonized Sr. Faustina in 2000 making her the “first saint of the new millennium.” Speaking of Sr. Faustina and the importance of the message contained in her Diary, the Pope call her “the great apostle of Divine Mercy in our time.”

Today, we continue to rely of Saint Faustina as a constant reminder of the message to trust in Jesus’ endless mercy, and to live life mercifully toward others. We also turn to her in prayer and request her intercession to our merciful Savior on our behalf. At the National Shrine of The Divine Mercy, we include the following in our 3 o’clock prayers:

O my Jesus, each of Your saints reflects one of Your virtues; I desire to reflect Your compassionate heart, full of mercy; I want to glorify it. Let Your mercy, O Jesus, be impressed upon my heart and soul like a seal, and this will be my badge in this and the future life.

What is the Divine Mercy Chaplet?

Learn How To Pray the Divine Mercy ChapletPrayed on ordinary rosary beads, The Chaplet of The Divine Mercy is an intercessory prayer that extends the offering of the Eucharist, so it is especially appropriate to use it after having received Holy Communion at Holy Mass. It may be said at any time, but our Lord specifically told St. Faustina to recite it during the nine days before the Feast of Mercy (the first Sunday after Easter). He then added: “By this Novena, [of Chaplets] I will grant every possible grace to souls.” (796) 

The Lord requested that this Chaplet be said not only by Sr. Faustina, but by others: “Encourage souls to say the Chaplet that I have given you.”

It is likewise appropriate to pray the Chaplet during the “Hour of Great Mercy” — three o’clock each afternoon (recalling the time of Christ’s death on the cross). In His revelations to St. Faustina, Our Lord asked for a special remembrance of His Passion at that hour. 

Jesus said to Sr. Faustina; “Say unceasingly this chaplet that I have taught you.  Anyone who says it will receive great MERCY at the hour of death. Priests will recommend it to sinners as the last hope. Even the most hardened sinner, if he recites this chaplet even once, will receive grace from My infinite Mercy. I want to give unimaginable graces to those who trust in My Mercy”

To learn more about the history of the Divine Mercy Chaplet, please visit this page of The Divine Mercy web site. For a complete guide to saying the Divine Mercy Chaplet, please visit this page of The Divine Mercy web site. 

What is Divine Mercy Sunday

Among all of the elements of devotion to The Divine Mercy requested by our Lord through St. Maria Faustina Kowalska, the Feast of Mercy holds first place. Our Lord’s explicit desire is that this feast be celebrated on the first Sunday after Easter. It was officially called the Second Sunday of Easter after the liturgical reform of Vatican II. Now, by the Decree of the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments, the name of this liturgical day has been changed to: “Second Sunday of Easter, or Divine Mercy Sunday.”

For complete information on Divine Mercy, you can visit the official The Divine Mercy web site